Recent News

April 15, 2022

On Friday, April 22, please join us from 6 to 8 p.m. for a hands-on art-making event hosted with our friends at Self Help Graphics & Art, with instruction by lead teaching artist Oscar Rodriguez. As the latest installment of our Corita 101 workshop series, this free event will give participants the opportunity to help create and personalize a collection of posters with graphics created by Juliette Bellocq and Sheharazad Fleming that feature some of Corita’s iconic words and phrases. Once completed, the collection of posters will travel to Washington, D.C., where they will be part of a performance at the Kennedy Center.

Register Here for this free  event

POW POW POWER UP: Someday is Now is a project made collaboratively by interdisciplinary artist Liss LaFleur, composer Samuel Beebe, and the Corita Art Center, and performed by choral ensemble The Artifice. POW POW POWER UP: Someday is Now is an opera installation inspired by Corita using AI technology and will be full of visual references from historical Mary’s Day processions at Immaculate Heart College.

This performance is the first of 29 mini-operas, each referencing one individual artwork from Corita’s heroes and sheroes series. Each opera will operate as a temporary monument of collective community, combining public art, site-specificity, and audience participation to evoke joy and center conversation around difficult social issues.

This inaugural performance, inspired by the artwork titled green fingers, will gather a community to center on environmental justice. Free and open to the public in the DC area, the event invites participants to join the performance in a celebratory procession on May 1, 2022, at 7:00 pm. outside the REACH at the Kennedy Center.

We hope that you will be able to join us both in-person and in-spirit for this incredible collaboration that brings together two coasts for a breath of fresh air.

March 21, 2022

On the occasion of Women’s History Month, we invite you to join us for a hands-on, virtual event centered around digital literacy and activism, taking place on Saturday, March 26.

There is a significant gender gap on Wikipedia. These well-documented gender inequities are most apparent in the under-representation of women and non-binary artists on the website. They also contribute to a bias in content and language, and the erasure of knowledge and history. Let's help change that!

Corita Art Center is pleased to host this presentation and workshop led by Amber Berson, an advisor at Art+Feminism, a project that works for a more equitable Wikipedia. The event will begin with a 45-minute presentation on the importance of not just how to edit but how to read Wikipedia, and the ways activism is helping to address the platform’s systemic biases. Next, Berson will lead a 45-minute workshop on how to edit the tenth most visited website in the world!

We hope that you will join us for this fun and low-key participatory event, open to people of all gender identities and expressions. No experience is necessary: simply join the Zoom meeting with your personal computer or tablet (*we are unable to accommodate mobile phones for the workshop component).


Time: March 26, 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Pacific Time

Register Here for this free virtual event


About Amber Berson

Amber Berson is a writer, curator, and art historian interested in digital advocacy and alternative governance models in the arts.

She most recently curated Souper Spaghetti (2021, with Manon Tourigny), Utopia as Method (2018); World Cup! (2018); The Let Down Reflex (2016-2018, with Juliana Driever); TrailMix (2014, with Eliane Ellbogen); *~._.:*JENNIFER X JENNIFER*:.~ (2013, with Eliane Ellbogen); The Annual Art Administrator’s Relay Race (2013, with Nicole Burisch); The Wild Bush Residency (2012–14); and was the 2016 curator-in-residence as part of the France-Quebec Cross-Residencies at Astérides in Marseille, France. She is an advisor at Art+Feminism, a project that works for a more equitable Wikipedia, and was the 2019-2020 Wikipedian in Residence at Concordia University. She is also the Executive Director at The Visual Arts Centre in Montreal, Quebec.

About Art+Feminism

Wendy Red Star, "Ashkaamne (matrilineal inheritance)," 2019.This artwork was produced for the 2019 Art+Feminism Call to Action Art Commission.

Art+Feminism builds a community of activists that is committed to closing information gaps related to gender, feminism, and the arts, beginning with Wikipedia.

When cis and trans women, non-binary people, Black, Indigenous, and people of color communities are not represented in the writing and editing on the tenth-most-visited site in the world, information about people like us gets skewed and misrepresented. The stories get mistold. We lose out on real history. That’s why we’re here: to change it.

Since 2014, over 20,000 people at more than 1,500 events around the world have participated in our edit-a-thons, resulting in the creation and improvement of more than 100,000 articles on Wikipedia and its sister projects.

From coffee shops and community centers to the largest museums and universities in the world, Art+Feminism leads a do-it-yourself and do-it-with-others campaign that teaches people of all gender identities and expressions to edit Wikipedia.

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services

December 21, 2021

YOU ARE WHO WE LOVE

A collaborative poem for Corita Day, with words contributed by participants and assembled by writer and educator, Matthew Burgess.

Inspired by Aracelis Girmay.


You are who I love, 

checking the air on my tires

You, lost in thought

You being perfect just the way you are


Dancing in the yard with such joy 

You are who I love, jumping 

from sofa to chair to ground as you battle

     imaginary foes 


You who knows no stranger

You who tend the earth

You learning to surf at age eight, 

sitting underwater, calling yourself an ancient 

     Egyptian name 


You who noticed the beaver in the park 

You smiling at me with paint on your hands, in your hair

You keeping your nose warm

You crying in the bedroom, impatient, tired, hungry


     You are who I love


Wondering about a mystery cross on a white wall 

You are who I love,

You as a victim, quiet and observing — 

You, still my friend.


You my difficult ones who make me grow

You who hold me up when I feel down

You who laugh at my jokes

You, alone in stony echoes

You, sharing friendship and love

Growing whole boats of plants from single stems

You try and try and try and you succeed 

You, who helps me navigate the healthcare system 

     for my 95 year-old father 


You are who I love


Trying every day with every ounce to believe

Letting me sit extra close and nuzzle into the fur in your collar

Always with a furrowed brow, the weight of the world 

     on your beautiful young face 


You are who I love 


You who are my person 

You working hard 

You the light of my heart

You laughing with me

You who brings the candle lit to my table

You sick, you well

You are there


You who smells of freshly cut alliums lingering on my fingers,

You who sit on a swing, making my Saturdays delightful, 

You love so that we can be generous always


You whose heart is always full of love and willing to forgive

You playing a tune like a clear bell on a simple gourd instrument 

     on the street outside the park 

You, building toward an unknown future, insulating 

     old thin walls for warmer times


There once was a girl who knew love with no bounds 

You, who knew me

I love the person you are becoming


You, old tree, who lets your gold fall at at once after a hard frost

You speaking to me through the acts of kindness of others

You sitting quietly


      You are who I love


You who row your boat in the dark

You who sings like an angel

You in your bunny boxer shorts, not caring who sees you 

     going to the mailbox


You are who I love 


The one who notices beauty everywhere you go,

     smiling at me each time we pass 

You, bringing an old friendship forward to the present, 

laden with the history and loss we each bear 


You writing words of love to me 

even if it was hard, confusing, ended–

     I still believe you did. 

You my favorite person, who I love, 

You are why I’m me.


You are who I love, finding the beauty in small things, 

balancing me out, being grumpy when I am not 

You, moving closer to Heaven


Hiding under the dining room chair, writing messages

     You are who I love

You, mending hearts with kind words, 

peeling the persimmons to prepare a purée for the pan bread

You walking away    


You who tell me everyday you will pray for me

You making family reunions into Celebrations with music and art

You who wonders who are creating while I do


You are who I love


Bravely sharing your whites and reds so swiftly,

playing the piano, one of mom and dad’s favorite tunes 

You smiling at anyone’s presence, opening 

     your eyes and letting me in

You with a freckled face and vocal stims and disconnect with the world 

You are who I love!


Steaming the beets, caring for us and others,

Telling a story, you are who I love


You trying to live by your own rules

     You, alone

You in the chair that moves with your feet

You say everything is an experiment

You are sweet fruit, jellybeans and chocolate


You who are part of the IHM community, 

who gave me the grace to become who I am today

I see a cascade of love and history and care 

     and creativity when we meet


You are who I love, who I miss so dearly 

You struggling and loving the best that you can

You who cry


You are who I love


You who saves ‘til messy rooms demand attention 

You gardening with love

You who breathe and blink

You doing your best

You helping me to get myself and others to places 

because I can’t keep track of my own time and many promises to others

You setting the groundwork for who I become

You who know love has no bounds


You are who I love, packing our kale and bread

and eggs into our canvas bag with care, a smile, a story

     and a “take care” every time 

You sitting watching tv, you driving very carefully, 

You cooking dinner with way too much food, 

you whether cheerful or in a sad mood


You who worry about dying stars and boiling planets 

You smiling at me and I know you are proud 

You with your boat, your sure hand at the rudder

You are needed for our world is broken 


You are who I love


You are me when you walk among the trees, 

wandering through the colors, the pathways 

and the rhythms that summon the marigolds


You always napping in the sunny spot

You who loves popcorn

You, who–at 97—bring so much joy to all who encounter you

You, bursting with life, an incendiary force, 

     vibrating wildly


You are who we love. 


–November 21, 2021


November 20, 2021

You're invited to an evening of togetherness online with friends new and old (and some special guests!) in celebration of Corita Day on Saturday, November 20, 2021, registration is free, and all are welcome!

Funds raised during the festivities will support the Corita Art Center's ongoing mission to preserve and promote Corita's art and legacy through digitization initiatives and art educational programming.

Time: November 20, 2021 5:00pm to 6:00pm Pacific Time

Register for free

September 16, 2021


On Saturday, September 25th, join Los Angeles-based artist, educator, and researcher Álvaro D. Márquez in the latest installment of our Corita 101 virtual workshop series. As part of an ongoing partnership between Corita Art Center and Casa Esperanza, the workshop will center the youth of Panorama City.

Drawing inspiration from Corita’s pedagogy, this workshop will teach you about the expressive potential of line and color. Under Álvaro’s guidance, you will learn to make an abstract drawing and turn it into an accordion book, while exploring the ways that color and line can communicate feelings and emotional states.

This program was made possible through the Community Impacts Art Grant thanks to the Department of Arts And Culture Los Angeles.

Time: September 25, 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Pacific Time (US and Canada)


Register Here for this free virtual event

Click here to download worksheets


You will need the following materials:


- 1 sheet of 8.5” x 11” paper
- Cardboard or foamboard
- Washable markers
- Scissors
- Pencil
- Glue stick
- Ruler

About Álvaro D. Márquez:

Álvaro D. Márquez is a multidisciplinary artist working with printmaking, fiber art, sculpture, and installation. Their work explores issues around social, racial, and gender inequality and engages questions about the self, history, and one’s place in it. Based in Los Angeles, they hail from the working class immigrant community of East Salinas, CA.

About Casa Esperanza:
At Casa Esperanza, we empower and provide our clients — the families of Blythe Street and the greater Panorama City area — with the resources to be successful and to create a positive impact in their community. More than a resources center or a safe place to go after school, we are an integral part of the fabric of our community. It is our mission to ensure that youth and parents alike have the tools they need to create their best possible future. Learn more at casaesperanzaihm.org

This program was made possible through the Community Impacts Art Grant thanks to the Department of Arts And Culture Los Angeles.

July 20, 2021

In celebration of the forthcoming book release, please join us for a virtual art-making session led by Matthew Burgess and Kara Kramer, author and illustrator of Make Meatballs Sing: The Life & Art of Corita Kent. 

In the spirit of Corita, plorkshop is a hands-on experience that combines work and play. The event is free and all ages. are welcome. Participants are encouraged to have basic supplies on-hand, such as scissors, glue stick, markers, drawing paper, and colored/patterned paper for collage making.

 

When: July 25, 1 p.m. PST / 4 p.m. EST

Co-hosted by Enchanted Lion Books

May 19, 2021

On Saturday, May 22nd, join Ana Dziengel, founder of Babble Dabble Do, in the next installment of Corita 101 workshops. As part of an ongoing partnership between Corita Art Center and Casa Esperanza, the workshop will center the youth of Panorama City.

Spend an incredible afternoon with Ana creating “Collage Cubes” with 3D Collage. Collage Cubes are based on Corita Kent’s explorations with found graphics, collage, and the juxtaposition of images and type. In this project, you will make four cubes, each collaged with found images and type from magazines, newspapers, old artwork, comics, junk mail, and whatever you can find!

Time:

May 22, 2021 01:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Register Here
Download supplies and worksheets

About Ana Dziengel:
Ana is an architect and furniture designer turned blogger at Babble Dabble Do. Her 2018 book STEAM Play & Learn and has sold over 10,000 copies to date. She started Camp STEAM in 2017 and Afterschool STEAM in 2018 in the Los Angeles area to bring STEAM projects to her local community. Learn more at babbledabbledo.com

About Casa Esperanza:
At Casa Esperanza, we empower and provide our clients — the families of Blythe Street and the greater Panorama City area — with the resources to be successful and to create a positive impact in their community. More than a resources center or a safe place to go after school, we are an integral part of the fabric of our community. It is our mission to ensure that youth and parents alike have the tools they need to create their best possible future. Learn more at casaesperanzaihm.org

This program was made possible through the Community Impacts Art Grant thanks to the Department of Arts And Culture Los Angeles.

April 6, 2021
Installation view, to the everyday miracle, kaufmann repetto, Milan, 2021.

Please join Dieter Roelstraete and Olivian Cha in conversation on the occasion of "to the everyday miracle," a solo exhibition on view at kaufmann repetto in Milan.


On Saturday, April 10th at 10amPST/1pmEST,  join Dieter Roelstraete, curator at the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society at the University of Chicago, and Olivian Cha, curator of the Corita Art Center.


The exhibition presents a retrospective view, featuring serigraphs and watercolors spanning across her career, from the 1950s through the 1980s. In this webinar, Roelstraete and Cha will discuss Kent's practice at the intersection of art, language, and politics.


Please note: the talk will take place via Zoom in English and will be recorded. Participants will be sent a login link upon registration.

Register Here

February 18, 2021

We're thrilled to welcome you to our redesigned site! We will be posting news about programming, events, and exhibitions here, but as we transition to this new format, you can still access our archived Tumblr.

November 11, 2020

Join the Corita Art Center and Greetings from South Central LA to celebrate the importance of art education as we collaborate on some fun Corita-inspired programming in the coming weeks! Swipe for more info about upcoming pop-ups, the virtual workshop, and learn how you can #GetWithTheAction!

Stop by on 11/14 Hanks Mini Market and 11/21 Cruzitas Deli and Cafe to pick up a Corita 101 art box including the new heroes & sheroes zine worksheet, created by art educator Karina Esperanza Yánez and designed by the Design Lab at Otis College and printed in LA by Typecraft.


11/14/2020

11:30AM - 2:30 PM

Hank’s Mini Market

3301 West Florence Avenue

Los Angeles, CA


11/21/2020

9:30AM - 12:30 PM

Cruzita’s Deli and Café

7121 State Street

Huntington Park, CA


1:30 - 3:00 PM

Virtual Workshop with art educator Karina Esperanza Yánez, Founder of Greetings from South LA.

Join us on Zoom. All ages, all skill levels welcome, but we encourage you to pick up a Corita 101 art kit or download materials in advance!

Be sure to register:  bitly.ws/ax4q

October 29, 2020

Celebrate virtually with the Corita Art Center on Corita’s birthday this November 20th, at 6pm.

We would like to tip our party hats to you dear friends, and share (with the help of some special guests) the hard work we were able to accomplish through your support.  Help us continue to preserve Corita’s legacy and build a stronger collective community. Reserve your spot for the Corita Day virtual celebration and receive a complimentary gift box to help you enjoy the evening. Boxes will include special Corita merchandise, party supplies, and a sweet treat.

Visit our store to purchase tickets and reserve your box today!

September 17, 2020

Corita Art Center is a project of the Immaculate Heart Community. Read the Immaculate Heart Community’s 2019 Annual Report, inspired by the “irregular bulletin.”

September 14, 2020

Published intermittently by the Immaculate Heart College art department from 1956 - 1963, the “irregular bulletin” was a newsletter edited by the inimitable Sister Magdalen Mary, announcing the various activities and accomplishments of the students and faculty, including Corita, who succeeded Sister Magdalen Mary as head of the art department. So what was it, you ask? The “irregular bulletin” was initially comprised of a few pages of printed paper announcing departmental news, but it then quickly evolved into a longer and broader publication, with a distinct graphic style that in many ways presaged the formation of contemporary zines.

In this video, we hear from Juliette Bellocq and Hermine Lees, two women who collect the “irregular bulletin” and appreciate the unique creativity and ideas of Sister Magdalen Mary. Juliette Bellocq is a graphic designer who runs Handbuilt Studio, a practice dedicated to design for education, culture and activism. She designed the Immaculate Heart Community’s “irregular bulletin”-inspired 2019 Annual Report. Hermine Lees is a member of the Immaculate Heart Community. When asked to describe her relationship to Sister Magdalen Mary, she wrote, “a devoted student, sincere friend and caring helper in all her wild and wonderful endeavors.”

Thanks to a grant from California Revealed, all issues of the “irregular bulletin” will soon be digitized. Stay tuned for details.

Corita Art Center is a project of the Immaculate Heart Community. Read their 2019 Annual Report, inspired by the “irregular bulletin,” here.

April 9, 2020

We’ve launched a new video series inspired by Corita Kent and Jan Steward’s seminal text, Learning by Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit. This video introduces the main concepts in Learning by Heart – looking, sources, structure, connect + create, work + play, and celebrations. Over the next few months, we will be posting videos by artists around the world, who will share how they engage with these ideas in their own creative practice. If you want to brush up on a specific topic, they are all posted as individual videos as well. We hope you enjoy the series!

March 16, 2020
Corita Kent, “yes #3,” 1979, serigraph, 20 x 20 inches © 2020 The Corita Art Center, The Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles.

Friends, We hope you are all staying safe, and finding moments of peace and hope during these uncertain times. To support community health and well-being, Corita Art Center is temporarily closed. We will update you with reopening information as soon as it is available. While we will miss seeing you at the Center, we are actively exploring ways to adapt Corita’s teachings so that we can all remain creatively connected in our homes and online. Stay tuned for updates. As ever, we take comfort in Corita’s art and words, and hope you do the same.

❤️,

Corita Art Center

February 10, 2020

In 1985, the US Post Office released the Love Stamp designed by Corita Kent. This is the lesser-known story behind Corita’s most well-known work.

January 28, 2020

Now streaming, the inaugural event of The Great Humans Series, featuring Roxane Gay and Abbi Jacobson in conversation at Second Home Hollywood. The event is a reboot of the “Great Men Series,” a lecture series organized by Corita and the Immaculate Heart College Art Department in the 1960s. Lisa Congdon kicked off the event and set the stage for the unmoderated evening. What followed was a generous and engaging conversation between two creative women on topics ranging from the elusive work/life balance and the challenges of social media, to morning routines and the educators, friends, and family members who have encouraged their journey. We hope you enjoy watching these inspiring women, and stay tuned for an announcement about the next event in the series, coming this April!

December 12, 2019

We had a hard time not highlighting every word in this clipping from “We Need Decembers,” an article by Corita in the December 1969 issue of Ladies Home Journal. Read the full article here.

November 18, 2019

We are thrilled to announce that Wednesday, November 20th has been named #CoritaDayinLA. The honor falls on what would have been Corita Kent’s 101st birthday. Throughout Corita’s 100th year, we have ramped up our efforts to grow Corita’s legacy and introduce her to a new generation, both in Los Angeles and around the world. In that spirit, we want to honor her on Corita Day with an online celebration—or in 1960s terms, “a happening”—that will share her art and message of hope, love, and justice with an even wider audience.

If you aren’t yet familiar with Corita, we hope you celebrate Corita Day by getting to know this inspiring artist and educator: read her bio, follow us on Instagram or Facebook, or sign up for our newsletter!

If you are already well acquainted, we hope you will join our online “happening” and share Corita’s artwork, story, or teachings via social media on November 20th. We invite you to create your own artwork if you desire, but we also have a few sample posts here. Thank you for being a part of Corita’s legacy!

November 6, 2019

Corita Art Center and CHIRLA, the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights, partnered to build an altar titled Corita Art Center x CHIRLA: amar la justicia for this year’s Dia de los Muertos celebration at Hollywood Forever cemetery. The altar honored members of the extended CHIRLA family lost in the struggle for immigrant rights.

Corita used bold and graphic serigraphs to expose injustice around the world while delivering a message of love, hope, and justice. In this spirit, the altar was constructed out of one of Corita’s favorite everyday items, the cardboard box, and featured an enlarged version of love justice, a serigraph she first created in 1966 which boldly depicts the Camus quote, “I should like to be able to love my country and still love justice,” in red, white, and blue.

November 5, 2019

For the anniversary of the Watts Rebellion, we take an in depth look at Corita’s “my people,” from 1965.

October 10, 2019

For Corita, celebration was an art form. All celebrations contained variations on the same ingredients: special colors, words, clothes, processions, etc. Corita analyzed celebrations in this way in order to update and revitalize traditions. In August 2019, the Corita Art Center went to CicLAvia: Meet the Hollywoods to identify some of the ingredients of a celebration.

October 1, 2019

We found this great clipping from an interview with Corita in The New Yorker from 1966. May we all be blessed with Corita’s prolific productivity in the coming month. Don’t forget Rule # 7: The only rule is work!

January 1, 2019

Introducing our “From the Archives” series, where we take a peek inside the archives at the Corita Art Center to share a lesser-known piece by Corita Kent.

This first installment features Olivian Cha, our Curator and Collections Manager, uncovering a poster commissioned by the Poor People’s Campaign in 1968 for their March on Washington. Olivian notes Corita’s frequent use of newspaper clippings in her work, and how it illustrates her understanding of the media’s growing impact on society.

October 1, 2018

Save the date!

🗓 #Corita100 Celebration❗️🎈🎉💜
Saturday November 10, 2018
Blessed Sacrament School Auditorium
6441 Sunset Blvd
Hollywood
#coritakent